Array

In this section, we will create a small C program that generates 10 numbers. To do that, we will use a new variable arrangement called an array.

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An array lets you declare and work with a collection of values of the same type. For example, you might want to create a collection of five integers. One way to do it would be to declare five integers directly:

int a , b , c , d , e ;
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This is okay, but what if you needed a thousand integers? An easier way is to declare an array of five integers:

int a [5];
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The five separate integers inside this array are accessed by an index. All arrays start at index zero and go to n-1 in C. Thus, int a[5]; contains five elements. For

int a [5];
a [0] = 12;
a [1] = 9 ;
a [2] = 14;
a [3] = 5;
a [4] = 1;
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One of the nice things about array indexing is that you can use a loop to manipulate the index. For example, the following code initializes all of the values in the array to 0:

int a [5];
int i ;
for (i = 0 ; i < 5 ; i++)
{
a[i] = 0;
}
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You declare arrays by inserting an array size after a normal declaration, as shown below:

int a [10]; //array of integer
char s [100]; //array of character
float f [20]; //array of float
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